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Keep up-to-date with the latest news from the Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research at Hebrew SeniorLife.

Trajectory of Functional Recovery after Postoperative Delirium

BOSTON—August 10, 2016— Researchers from the Harvard Medical School-affiliated Hebrew SeniorLife Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research, in collaboration with scientists from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Brown University, and Northeastern University, have discovered that postoperative delirium negatively impacts recovery in older adults.

Nutrition Advice for Active Seniors: An interview with celebrity nutritionist Keri Glassman and HSL researcher Dr. Shivani Sahni

In a recent interview for CapeCod.com, Dr. Shivani Sahni, a Nutritional Epidemiologist from Hebrew SeniorLife's Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research along with Keri Glassman, R.D., M.S., a celebrity nutritionist and registered dietitian gave their advice on healthy eating tips for seniors. Read their thoughts here.

Heritability of Thoracic Spine Curvature

BOSTON – August 2, 2016 – Researchers from the Harvard affiliated Hebrew SeniorLife Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research recently published a study in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, suggesting that hyperkyphosis may be heritable, or passed on from parents to offspring.  

Severity of Kyphosis and Decline in Lung Function

BOSTON—July 28, 2016— Researchers from the Harvard affiliated Hebrew SeniorLife Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research, have published a recent article in Journals of Gerontology: Medical Sciences, suggesting that preventing or slowing progression of hyperkyphosis may reduce pulmonary decline in olde

A Cinderella Tale: Can New Shoes Change the Life of a Person With Knee Osteoarthritis?

Dr. Marian T. Hannan, Co-Director of Musculoskeletal Research Center at Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research contributed this editorial in the Annals of Internal Medicine detailing findings from a randomized trail that compared shoes designed to unload the knee versus new, conventional shoes.

Delirium in Older Patients after Surgery May Lead to Long-Term Cognitive Decline

BOSTON— July 14, 2016— Researchers from the Harvard Medical School - affiliated Hebrew SeniorLife Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research have found increasing evidence that delirium in older surgical patients may be associated with long-term cognitive decline.

Sub-Sensory vibratory noise augments the physiologic complexity of postural control in older adults.

BOSTON— Researchers from the Harvard affiliated Hebrew SeniorLife Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research, have published arecent article in the Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation which gives evidence that sub-sensory vibrations delivered to the foot sole of older adults significantly augmented the physiologic complexity of postural contro

Call for applications: 2016 Delirium Boot Camp

Delirium Research Boot Camp - applications due July 15, 2016: CEDARTREE will be hosting a three-day intensive course on delirium research November 6-8, 2016 at the Inn at Longwood Medical in Boston, MA. Recognized experts in the field will discuss cutting edge research approaches, from assessment and methodology to novel technologies and interventions. Attendees will have the opportunity to network with world-renowned experts in delirium and related fields. This year, CEDARTREE will also be offering two Pilot Awards, prestigious awards for new research projects related to delerium.

Osteoporosis drugs not taken by many who need them: reports

Fear and a lack of awareness in many older adults that they have the bone-weakening disease osteoporosis has led to a growing public health concern by leading medical organizations.

In a joint statement, the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, National Osteoporosis Foundation and National Bone Health Alliance, announced their concerns.

Videoconferencing between hospital staff, nursing home staff offers new dementia treatment

Nursing homes in the United States care for increasing numbers of people with dementia, yet many lack access to geriatric psychiatrists, behavioral neurologists and other specialists who may help manage symptoms associated with dementia, including behavioral issues. As a result, nursing home staff may resort to physical restraints or antipsychotic medications to manage behavioral challenges, which can significantly compromise a patient's health, autonomy and dignity.

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