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Keep up-to-date with the latest news from the Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research at Hebrew SeniorLife.

Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research Study Finds Understanding End-Stage Dementia Improves End-of-Life Care

Nursing home residents with end-stage dementia whose health care proxies understand the clinical course of the disease are less likely to be treated aggressively near the end of life and more likely to receive comfort care, according to researchers at the Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging of Hebrew SeniorLife, affiliated with Harvard Medical School.

Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research Study Finds Understanding End-Stage Dementia Improves End-of-Life Care

Nursing home residents with end-stage dementia whose health care proxies understand the clinical course of the disease are less likely to be treated aggressively near the end of life and more likely to receive comfort care, according to researchers at the Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research of Hebrew SeniorLife, affiliated with Harvard Medical School.

Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research Study Finds That Delirium Accelerates Memory Decline in Alzheimer’s Patients

Scientists have long suspected that delirium, an acute and relatively sudden confusional state, is linked to dementia. In fact, studies have shown that dementia patients are at increased risk of developing dementia. Now, researchers at the Marcus Institute of Hebrew SeniorLife have found that episodes of delirium rapidly accelerate cognitive decline and memory loss in Alzheimer’s disease patients. The study appeared in the May 5 issue of the journal Neurology.

Researchers Find Disparities in Depression Among Older Hispanics in U.S.

Older Puerto Ricans have higher rates of depression than other Hispanics living in the United States, according to a new study by researchers at Hebrew SeniorLife’s Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research.

HSL Scientists Contribute to Gene Study That Could Aid in Osteoporosis Detection

A consortium of researchers, including scientists at Hebrew SeniorLife’s Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research, has identified common variations of genes that are associated with both bone mineral density (BMD) and fracture risk. The findings may help clinicians predict who is at risk for osteoporosis-related fractures and may help in the development of new anti-osteoporosis drugs.

Hebrew SeniorLife Researcher Finds Antibiotic Use High in Dementia Patients Near Death

An article co-authored by Susan L. Mitchell, M.D., M.P.H., of Hebrew SeniorLife’s Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research reports that nursing home residents with advanced dementia are frequently prescribed antibiotic medications, especially during the two weeks before death. This practice raises concerns about the end-of-life care of patients dying with advanced dementia, as well as the emergence of antimicrobial resistance. The paper appears in the February 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Hebrew SeniorLife Study Finds High Blood Pressure Increases Disability Risk Later in Life

High blood pressure significantly increases an individual’s risk of disabilities such as the inability to lift objects, walk up or down stairs, or bathe oneself, later in life, according to researchers at Hebrew SeniorLife’s Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research. The study, partially funded by the National Institute on Aging, was published in Hypertension: Journal of the American Heart Association.

High-Dose Vitamin D Reduces Risk of Falls in Nursing Home Residents

Researchers at Hebrew SeniorLife’s Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research have found that a high dose of vitamin D can reduce the risk and incidence of falls in nursing home residents.

High-Dose Vitamin D Reduces Risk of Falls in Nursing Home Residents

Researchers at Hebrew SeniorLife’s Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research have found that a high dose of vitamin D can reduce the risk and incidence of falls in nursing home residents.

Hebrew SeniorLife study shows promise for technology’s role in easing caregiver stress

Diane F. Mahoney, Ph.D., director of Enhancing Caregiving through Technology at the Research and Training Institute of Hebrew SeniorLife, recently completed a three-year study in which she and a team of Institute researchers partnered with local businesses to test a program called Worker Interactive Networking (WIN). The WIN program was designed to help employees manage the additional task of caring for impaired senior family members alone at home. WIN provided on-line sources of caregiving support and a wireless home monitoring component to selected participants.   

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