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Keep up-to-date with the latest news from the Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research at Hebrew SeniorLife.

Hebrew SeniorLife Researcher Finds Antibiotic Use High in Dementia Patients Near Death

An article co-authored by Susan L. Mitchell, M.D., M.P.H., of Hebrew SeniorLife’s Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research reports that nursing home residents with advanced dementia are frequently prescribed antibiotic medications, especially during the two weeks before death. This practice raises concerns about the end-of-life care of patients dying with advanced dementia, as well as the emergence of antimicrobial resistance. The paper appears in the February 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Hebrew SeniorLife Study Finds High Blood Pressure Increases Disability Risk Later in Life

High blood pressure significantly increases an individual’s risk of disabilities such as the inability to lift objects, walk up or down stairs, or bathe oneself, later in life, according to researchers at Hebrew SeniorLife’s Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research. The study, partially funded by the National Institute on Aging, was published in Hypertension: Journal of the American Heart Association.

High-Dose Vitamin D Reduces Risk of Falls in Nursing Home Residents

Researchers at Hebrew SeniorLife’s Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research have found that a high dose of vitamin D can reduce the risk and incidence of falls in nursing home residents.

High-Dose Vitamin D Reduces Risk of Falls in Nursing Home Residents

Researchers at Hebrew SeniorLife’s Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research have found that a high dose of vitamin D can reduce the risk and incidence of falls in nursing home residents.

Hebrew SeniorLife study shows promise for technology’s role in easing caregiver stress

Diane F. Mahoney, Ph.D., director of Enhancing Caregiving through Technology at the Research and Training Institute of Hebrew SeniorLife, recently completed a three-year study in which she and a team of Institute researchers partnered with local businesses to test a program called Worker Interactive Networking (WIN). The WIN program was designed to help employees manage the additional task of caring for impaired senior family members alone at home. WIN provided on-line sources of caregiving support and a wireless home monitoring component to selected participants.   

Hebrew SeniorLife Researchers Find Link Between Low Bone Density and Alzheimer’s Risk

In an article published recently in JAMA’s Archives of Neurology, researchers from the Research and Training Institute of Hebrew SeniorLife reported the results of a study that indicated a significant association between low bone mineral density (BMD), particularly in the lower femoral neck portion of the skeleton, and an increased incidence of Alzheimer’s disease in women.

Hebrew SeniorLife Researchers Find Link Between Low Bone Density and Alzheimer’s Risk

In an article published recently in JAMA’s Archives of Neurology, researchers from the Research and Training Institute of Hebrew SeniorLife reported the results of a study that indicated a significant association between low bone mineral density (BMD), particularly in the lower femoral neck portion of the skeleton, and an increased incidence of Alzheimer’s disease in women.

Plasma Homoscysteine Concentration Predicts Hip Fracture in Older Persons

A paper published this month in the New England Journal of Medicine presented new information about a novel new risk factor for hip fracture in older adults. The paper revealed a strong statistical association between elevated homocysteine levels in the blood and incidence of hip fracture. A paper appeared in the same issue that reported similar findings from another study conducted by researchers in the Netherlands.

Much Like the Rings of a Tree, Bones Reveal Biological Age in Humans

Researchers at the Research and Training Institute at Hebrew Rehabilitation Center for Aged have been studying bones to assess the impact of genes versus the environment on how an individual ages. In an article published recently in the Journal of Gerontology: Biological Sciences, lead author David Karasik, Ph.D., and colleagues describe how bones can reveal an individual’s biological age and how they used this information to conclude that genes seem to trump environmental factors when it comes to the aging process.

New Study Aims to Help Boston Seniors Stay Healthy and Remain Independent

Researchers in the Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research at Hebrew SeniorLife have begun recruiting seniors, age 70 and older, from Boston’s neighborhoods to take part in a study designed to assess their current health and any changes that may develop over a two-year period. The hope is that the information they gather will help those in the field of aging research, as well as clinicians and caregivers, discover ways to help adults remain healthy and independent as they age.

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